Marijuana Addiction

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Marijuana is a plant that contains the mind-altering chemical THC. People use marijuana by smoking, eating, or vaping the THC-rich extracts. Using marijuana regularly can lead to addiction, as well as other health problems.

Marijuana is a plant that contains the mind-altering chemical THC. People use marijuana by smoking, eating, or vaping the THC-rich extracts. Using marijuana regularly can lead to addiction, as well as other health problems.

Marijuana misuse is usually a chronic, ongoing problem. Unlike some other drugs, like opiate painkillers or alcohol, which can result in addiction almost immediately, marijuana can take months or even years for a person to become addicted. It is not unusual for marijuana users to experience withdrawal symptoms when they stop using the drug. These symptoms can include irritability, restlessness, trouble sleeping, weight loss, loss of appetite, and shaky hands. Some users have also displayed a lack of motivation and have been unable to keep up with work or family obligations when they are dependent on marijuana.

Depending on the amount a person uses, how long they have been using it, and their age when they begin to use it, marijuana can have different effects on the body and brain. Marijuana can affect memory, thinking, and learning ability. It can also lead to a lower IQ and increase the risk of mental illness, such as anxiety, depression, or psychosis. People can also experience health problems related to marijuana use, including lung and heart disease.

Some research supports the idea that marijuana is a “gateway drug,” meaning that someone who begins using it will go on to try other substances. However, other factors appear to be more important in whether a person becomes addicted to other drugs. One of these factors is the person’s environment, particularly their social interactions. Someone who grows up in a household with other drug users is more likely to attempt drugs themselves. This is especially true if the person’s parents use drugs.

If you or a loved one is struggling with marijuana addiction, getting help is the best course of action. A professional therapist can offer support and guidance in finding a treatment plan that works for you. Contact BetterHelp to get matched with an experienced therapist by phone, video chat, or web-based platform.

Although no medications are approved to treat marijuana misuse, research is being done on whether medicines used to treat sleep, anxiety, and other conditions may also be effective. In addition, cognitive behavioral therapy has been shown to be effective for helping people quit misusing marijuana.

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